Infosheet (January 23rd, 2018)

Queen's University - Department of Mathematics and Statistics


Tuesday, January 23

MSC Project Presentation

Time: 10:00 a.m.

Place: Jeffery 521

MSC Student: Stergios Gianniotis

Thesis Title: Empirical Study on Bayesian and Frequentist Model Calibration of Computer Models

Supervisor: D. Lin

Tuesday, January 23

Seminar in Free Probability and Random Matrices

Time: 4:00 p.m.

Place: Jeffery 319

Speaker: Rob Martin, University of Cape Town

Title: A multi-variable de Branges-Rovnyak model for row contractions

Abstract Attached

Wednesday, January 24

Number Theory Seminar

Time: 2:15 p.m.

Place: Jeffery 319

Speaker: François Séguin

Title: Heights of elliptic curves and the elliptic analogue of the two-variable Artin conjecture

Abstract Attached

Wednesday, January 24

Curves Seminar

Time: 3:30 p.m.

Place: Jeffery 319

Speaker: Mike Roth

Title: Zak’s theorems on tangencies I

Abstract Attached

Thursday, January 25

Math Club

Time: 5:30 p.m.

Place: Jeffery 118

Speaker: M. Ram Murty

Title: Stirling’s Formula

Abstract Attached

Friday, January 26

MSC Thesis Defense

Time: 10:00 a.m.

Place: Jeffery 521

MSC Student: Jingyi Liang

Thesis Title: Modelling of Dynamic computer Experiments with Both Qualitative and Quantitative Variables

Supervisors: D. Lin and G. Takahara

Friday, January 26

Dynamics Seminar

Time: 10:30 a.m.

Place: Jeffery 422

Speaker: Jory Griffin, Queen’s University

Title: Limit Theorems for Skew Translations

Abstract Attached

Friday, January 26

Grad Seminar

Time: 11:30 a.m.

Place: Jeffery 118

Speaker: Cédric Villani

Title: The Extraordinary Theorems of John Nash (The Royal Institution, Nov 2016)

Abstract Attached

Friday, January 26

Department Colloquium

Time: 2:30 p.m.

Place: Jeffery 234

Speaker: Milian Derpich, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa Maria, Valparaiso, Chile

Title: The Differential Entropy Gain Created by Linear Time-Invariant Systems

Abstract Attached

Items for the Info Sheet should reach Anne ( burnsa@queensu.ca) by noon on Monday. The Info Sheet is published every Tuesday.


Seminar in Free Probability and Random Matrices

Tuesday, January 23, 4:00 p.m. Jeffery 319

Speaker: Rob Martin

Title: A multi-variable de Branges-Rovnyak model for row contractions

Abstract: In the operator-model theory of de Branges and Rovnyak, any completely non-coisometric (CNC) contraction on Hilbert space is represented as the adjoint of the restriction of the backward shift

to a de Branges-Rovnyak subspace of the classical (vector-valued) Hardy space of analytic functions in the open unit dis.

We provide a natural extension of this model to the setting of CNC (row) contractions from several copies of a Hilbert space into itself. A canonical extension of Hardy space to several complex dimensions is the Drury-Arveson space, and the appropriate analogue of the adjoint of the restriction of the backward shift to a de Branges-Rovnyak space is a Gleason solution, a row contraction whose adjoint acts as a several-variable difference quotient. Our several-variable model completely characterizes the class of all CNC row contractions which can be represented as (extremal contractive) Gleason solutions for a multi-variable de Branges-Rovnyak subspace of (vector-valued) Drury-Arveson space.

Seminar website: http://www.mast.queensu.ca/~mingo/seminar/


Wednesday, January 24, 2:15 p.m. Jeffery 319 - Number Theory Seminar

Speaker: François Séguin

Title: Heights of elliptic curves and the elliptic analogue of the two-variable Artin conjecture

Abstract: Similar to the way Lang and Trotter adapted Artin's primitive root conjecture in the case of elliptic curves, we consider this natural adaptation for the two-variable Artin Conjecture. In light of our recent results for the two-variable setting, we present similar, unconditional lower bounds for this elliptic analogue.


Wednesday, January 24, 3:30 p.m. Jeffery 319 - Curves Seminar

Speaker: Mike Roth

Title: Zak’s theorems on tangencies I

Abstract: We will prove some results due to F. Zak on the linear spaces tangent to a smooth variety, the Gauss map of an embedded variety, and a related questions.


Thursday, January 25, 5:30 p.m. Jeffery 118 - Math Club

Speaker: M. Ram Murty

Title: Stirling’s Formula

Abstract: In 1733, Stirling found an asymptotic approximation to n! which playes a fundamental role in probability theory. He proved that n!∼(n/e)n2πn‾‾‾‾√ as n tends to infinity. We will give a "first-year calculus'' proof of this and also highlight a few of its applications.


Friday, January 26, 10:30 a.m. Jeffery 422 - Dynamics Seminar

Speaker: Jory Griffin

Title: Limit Theorems for Skew Translations

Abstract: Bufetov, Bufetov-Forni and Bufetov-Solomyak have proved limit theorems for translation flows, horocycle flows and tiling flows, respectively. We present here analogous results for skew translations of a torus.


Friday, January 26, 11:30 a.m. Jeffery 118 - Grad Seminar

Speaker: Cédric Villani

Title: The Extraordinary Theorems of John Nash (The Royal Institution, Nov 2016)

Abstract: Fields medal winner Cédric Villani takes us through the very special world of mathematical creation of John Nash, who founded several new chapters of game theory and geometric analysis in just a few revolutionary contributions that seemed to come from nowhere.


Friday, January 26, 2:30 p.m. Jeffery 234 - Department Colloquium

Speaker: Milan Derpich

Title: The Differential Entropy Gain Created by Linear Time-Invariant Systems

Abstract: The differential entropy of a continuous-valued random variable quantifies the uncertainty associated with the latter, and plays a crucial role in many fundamental result of Information Theory. This talk will discuss how the differential entropy rate of a random process exciting a discrete-time linear time invariant (LTI) system relates to that of the random process coming out of it. First, an apparent contradiction between existing results characterizing the difference between these two differential entropy rates, referred to a "differential entropy gain", will be exposed. It will then be shown how and when these results can be reconciled, presenting a geometric interpretation as well as novel results which quantify the differential entropy gain introduced by LTI systems. Finally, some of the implications of these results will be illustrated for three different problems, namely: the rate-distortion function for non stationary processes, an inequality in networked control systems, and the capacity of stationary Gaussian channels.

Contact Info

Department of Math & Stats
Jeffery Hall, 48 University Ave.
Kingston, ON Canada, K7L 3N6
Phone: (613) 533-2390
Fax: (613) 533-2964
mathstat@mast.queensu.ca
Office Hours: 8:30am-12:00pm & 1:00pm-4:30pm

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