Infosheet (March 7th, 2017)

Queen's University - Department of Mathematics and Statistics


Tuesday, March 7

Graduate Seminar

Time: 12:30 p.m.

Place: Jeffery 115

Documentary

Title: Hunting the hidden dimension

Abstract Attached

Tuesday, March 7

Dynamics Seminar

Time: 4:30 p.m. (new time)

Place: Jeffery 422

Speaker: Mikhail Hayhoe, Queen’s University

Title: TBA

Wednesday, March 8

Curves Seminar

Time: 3:30 pm.

Place: Jeffery 422

Speaker: Mike Roth

Title: G-linearizations and semistable points

Abstract Attached

Thursday, March 9

Math Club

Time: 5:30 p.m.

Place: Jeffery 118

Speaker: Dan Offin, Queen’s University

Title: Some peculiarities of the three body problem

Abstract Attached

Friday, March 10

Number Theory Seminar

Time: 10:30 a.m.

Place: Jeffery 422

Speaker: M. Ram Murty

Title: An Introduction to the Rankin-Selberg Convolution

Abstract Attached

Friday, March 10

Department Colloquium

Time: 2:30 p.m.

Place: Jeffery 234

Speaker: Brian Cook, Fields Institute

Title: Roth-type Theorems in Euclidean Spaces

Abstract Attached

Items for the Info Sheet should reach Anne ( burnsa@queensu.ca) by noon on Monday. The Info Sheet is published every Tuesday.


Tuesday, March 7, 12:30 p.m. Jeffery 115 - Graduate Seminar

Documentary

Title: Hunting the hidden dimension

Abstract: NOVA explores the fascinating world of fractals and looks at how they can be used to better understand everything from coastlines and rainforests to weather systems and human physiology.


Tuesday, March 7, 3:30 p.m. Jeffery 422 - Dynamics Seminar

Speaker: Mikhail Hayhoe, Queen's University

Title:

Abstract:


Wednesday, March 8, 3:30 p.m. Jeffery 422 Curves Seminar

Speaker: Mike Roth

Title: G-linearizations and semistable points

Abstract: We will start studying the problem of taking the quotient of a projective variety by a reductive group. The essential idea is to use a suitable projective embedding to reduce the problem to taking invariants. We will then have to spend some time understanding what our solution means.


Thursday, March 9, 5:30 p.m. Jeffery 118 - Math Club

Speaker: Dan Offin

Title: Some peculiarities of the three body problem

Abstract: Johannes Kepler published his three laws of planetary motion in the period 1608- 1619. I. Newton used these three laws to formulate his law of universal gravitation, published in his Principia 60 years later. Newton then went on to demonstrate how to completely solve the Kepler problem of a mass m moving freely in three dimensional space and gravitationally attracted to a fixed mass M. Moreover he was also able to show that the trajectories described by the mass m correspond to conic sections in the plane, for elliptical paths the position vector r(t) from M to m sweeps out equal areas in equal times, and that the period of the orbit and its semimajor axis conform to Keplers third law. These statements were deeply profound and have had an enormous impact on science and culture since that time. George Bernard Shaw, in proposing a toast to Einstein in October 1930 at London’s Savoy Hotel, stated that if we go back 2500 years, there are only three people who have created a universe in which we can study: Ptolemy, Newton and Einstein. In this lecture, I will give a very brief survey of some of the results and observations on the problem which Newton formulated, that of considering three bodies in the plane, interacting according to his law of gravitation.


Friday, March 10, 10:30 a.m. Jeffery 422 - Number Theory Seminar

Speaker: M. Ram Murty

Title: An Introduction to the Rankin-Selberg Convolution

Abstract: We will give a gentle introduction to the theory of the Rankin-Selberg convolution L-series,
derive its analytic continuation and functional equation as well as some of its special values (if time permits).


Friday, March 10, 2:30 p.m. Jeffery 234 - Department Colloquium

Speaker: Brian Cook

Title: Roth-type Theorems in Euclidean Spaces

Abstract: We shall discuss a result concerning sets of positive upper density in Euclidean spaces and 3-term arithmetic progressions. In particular, this talk will overview recent work (joint with Malabika

Pramanik and Akos Magyar) which shows that appropriate dense sets contain 3-term arithmetic progressions of all sufficiently large gaps when the gap size is measured in certain metrics which differ from the standard Euclidean metric. Results of this type with the standard Euclidean distance are known to fail.

Contact Info

Department of Math & Stats
Jeffery Hall, 48 University Ave.
Kingston, ON Canada, K7L 3N6
Phone: (613) 533-2390
Fax: (613) 533-2964
mathstat@mast.queensu.ca
Office Hours: 8:30am-12:00pm & 1:00pm-4:30pm

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