Infosheet (October 31st, 2017)

Queen's University - Department of Mathematics and Statistics


Wednesday, November 1

Number Theory Seminar

Time: 1:30 p.m.

Place: Jeffery 319

Speaker: Siddhi Pathak

Title: On a conjecture of Erdos

Abstract Attached

Friday, November 3

Graduate Student Seminar

Time: 11:30 a.m.

Place: Jeffery 422

Speaker: Pei-Lun Tseng

Title: Glimpse of Free Probability

Abstract Attached

Friday, November 3

Department Colloquium

Time: 2:30 p.m.

Place: Jeffery 234

Speaker: Abdolnasser Sadeghkhani, Queen’s University

Title: Bayesian Predictive Density Estimation with Additional Information

Abstract Attached

Monday, November 6

Dynamics Seminar

Time: 4:00 p.m.

Place: Jeffery 422

Speaker: Thomas Barthelmé

Title: Fubini’s nightmare: Katok’s original example

Abstract Attached

Monday, November 6

Geometry and Representation Theory Seminar

Time: 4:45 p.m.

Place: Jeffery 319

Speaker: Charles Paquette, RMC

Title: Homological dimensions of algebras

Abstract Attached

Friday, November 24

Ph.D. Thesis Defense

Time: 10:00 a.m.

Place: Jeffery 521

Ph.D. Student: Aaron Springford

Title: Spectral analysis of time series with latent and irregular times

Supervisors: D. Thomson and G. Takahara

Items for the Info Sheet should reach Anne ( burnsa@queensu.ca) by noon on Monday. The Info Sheet is published every Tuesday.


Wednesday, November 1, 1:30 p.m. Jeffery 319 - Number Theory Seminar

Speaker: Siddhi Pathak

Title: On a conjecture of Erdos

Abstract: In a written correspondence with A. Livingston in the 1960s, Erdos conjectured that for an arithmetic function f, periodic with period q satisfying: (i) f(n) is 1 or -1 if q does not divide n and (ii) f(n) = 0 if q divides n, the series \sum_{n=1}^{\infty} f(n)/n is not zero (and hence, evaluates to a transcendental number) whenever it converges. In 2007, this conjecture was proved by M. Ram Murty and N. Saradha for q congruent to 3 modulo 4 and is still open when q is congruent to 1 modulo 4. In this talk, we present some new developments toward this conjecture.


Friday, November 3, 11:30 a.m. Jeffery 422 - Graduate Student Seminar

Speaker: Pei-Lun Tseng

Title: Glimpse of Free Probability

Abstract: In this talk, we will introduce a key concept in free probability called free independence. Then we will compare the difference between classical and free probability. Moreover, we will give some applications of free probability in random matrix theory.


Friday, November 3, 2:30 p.m. Jeffery 234 - Department Colloquium

Speaker: Abdolnasser Sadeghkhani

Title: Bayesian Predictive Density Estimation with Additional Information

Abstract: In the context of Bayesian theory and decision theory, the estimation of a predictive density of a random variable represents an important and challenging problem. Often the times there is some additional information at our disposal which is unduly being ignored. In this talk, we deal with strategies to take into account this kind of information, in order to obtain effective and sometimes better performing predictive densities than others in the literature.


Monday, November 6, 4:00 p.m. Jeffery 422 - Dynamics Seminar

Speaker: Thomas Barthelmé

Title: Fubini’s nightmare: Katok’s original example

Abstract: We'll present Katok's example of Fubini's nightmare: a set of full Lebesgue measure E in the unit square (0,1) \times [0,1] that intersects each leaf of a (continuous) foliation (with analytic leaves) of the square in only one point.


Monday, November 6, 4:45 p.m. Jeffery 319

Geometry and Representation Theory Seminar

Speaker: Charles Paquette

Title: Homological dimensions of algebras

Abstract: Homological algebra is a relatively new branch of mathematics that made its origin when considering some problems in topology, and it was formalized by Cartan and Eilenberg in their book "Homological Algebra". Given an associative (and unital) algebra A, we are interested in approximating the A-modules by ideal ones (the projective or injective A-modules). The global dimension of an algebra measures how far we should go if we want to approximate our modules with projective ones. In this talk, I will consider the global dimension of an algebra, and mainly focus on finite dimensional algebras. I will give some necessary or sufficient conditions for an algebra to have finite global dimension.

Contact Info

Department of Math & Stats
Jeffery Hall, 48 University Ave.
Kingston, ON Canada, K7L 3N6
Phone: (613) 533-2390
Fax: (613) 533-2964
mathstat@mast.queensu.ca
Office Hours: 8:30am-12:00pm & 1:00pm-4:30pm

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